Revolutionary Mindset
The Philadelphia Public Record posted an apology on its website Sunday after a racist photo caption in the paper’s print edition named three Asian Americans “Me Too, Chinky Winky and Dinky Doo.”

The slurs appeared Thursday in a photo caption of Philadelphia councilman Mark Squilla and seven others who appear to be of Asian descent, Mediaite reported.

Publisher Jimmy Tayoun Sr. initially told Philadelphia magazine that the editor responsible for the caption is “a Britisher” who “didn’t mean anything by it.”

Mr. Tayoun later said he fired the editor, Philly.com reported.

“In our Aug. 21, 2014 issue an offensive slur was accidentally published in the Philadelphia Public Record,” The Record said in a formal apology. “This shocking lapse of professional conduct occurred contrary to our editorial directives and in no way reflects the views of our staff or our organization.

“An internal investigation is underway to uncover the source of this intolerable abuse and to prevent it from ever happening again,” it continued. “We apologize whole-heartedly to the Asian American community and to all Philadelphians of this vibrant, diverse city who work together to make it the best place in America to live and to grow.”

The Philadelphia Public Record posted an apology on its website Sunday after a racist photo caption in the paper’s print edition named three Asian Americans “Me Too, Chinky Winky and Dinky Doo.”

The slurs appeared Thursday in a photo caption of Philadelphia councilman Mark Squilla and seven others who appear to be of Asian descent, Mediaite reported.

Publisher Jimmy Tayoun Sr. initially told Philadelphia magazine that the editor responsible for the caption is “a Britisher” who “didn’t mean anything by it.”

Mr. Tayoun later said he fired the editor, Philly.com reported.

“In our Aug. 21, 2014 issue an offensive slur was accidentally published in the Philadelphia Public Record,” The Record said in a formal apology. “This shocking lapse of professional conduct occurred contrary to our editorial directives and in no way reflects the views of our staff or our organization.

“An internal investigation is underway to uncover the source of this intolerable abuse and to prevent it from ever happening again,” it continued. “We apologize whole-heartedly to the Asian American community and to all Philadelphians of this vibrant, diverse city who work together to make it the best place in America to live and to grow.”

The killing of Michael Brown has prompted a heated debate about how the media covers race and crime.

A recent study shows yet more evidence of a troubling tendency in this area. Media Matters looked at three months of broadcast news reports from four New York television stations and found that the coverage of crimes allegedly committed by black suspects far outpaced the actual racial breakdown of crime in New York City.

Too often, it seems, black people are disproportionately portrayed as the face of crime.

From the study:

According to averages of arrest statistics from the New York City Police Department (NYPD) for the past four years, African-American suspects were arrested in 54 percent of murders, 55 percent of thefts, and 49 percent of assaults. Meanwhile, over the past three months, the suspects in the four stations’ coverage of murders were 68 percent African-American, the suspects in their coverage of thefts were 80 percent African-American, and the suspects in their coverage of assaults were 72 percent African-American.
There’s a clear caveat to this study: three months is a very different period of time from four years. But, as the Columbia Journalism Review’s Alexis Sobel Fitts pointed out, the findings track with similar surveys that have been taken in the past:

In a study of the Chicago broadcast media, a research team found that black defendants were more likely than defendants of other races to be shown through a mugshot rather than a personal picture or none at all. Another study of television coverage found black suspects are twice as likely as white suspects to be shown on camera under police restraint.

The killing of Michael Brown has prompted a heated debate about how the media covers race and crime.

A recent study shows yet more evidence of a troubling tendency in this area. Media Matters looked at three months of broadcast news reports from four New York television stations and found that the coverage of crimes allegedly committed by black suspects far outpaced the actual racial breakdown of crime in New York City.

Too often, it seems, black people are disproportionately portrayed as the face of crime.

From the study:

According to averages of arrest statistics from the New York City Police Department (NYPD) for the past four years, African-American suspects were arrested in 54 percent of murders, 55 percent of thefts, and 49 percent of assaults. Meanwhile, over the past three months, the suspects in the four stations’ coverage of murders were 68 percent African-American, the suspects in their coverage of thefts were 80 percent African-American, and the suspects in their coverage of assaults were 72 percent African-American.
There’s a clear caveat to this study: three months is a very different period of time from four years. But, as the Columbia Journalism Review’s Alexis Sobel Fitts pointed out, the findings track with similar surveys that have been taken in the past:

In a study of the Chicago broadcast media, a research team found that black defendants were more likely than defendants of other races to be shown through a mugshot rather than a personal picture or none at all. Another study of television coverage found black suspects are twice as likely as white suspects to be shown on camera under police restraint.

The death of a 45-year-old man who struggled with police while being taken into custody in July in New York City has been ruled a homicide by the medical examiner’s office, according to CNN.

The man, Ronald Singleton, died in police custody on July 13, just four days before Eric Garner died after an officer put him in a choke hold, the report says. Garner’s death, also ruled a homicide by the New York City Medical Examiner, ignited protests across the nation about the use of excessive force by police in the black community.

In Singleton’s case, the medical examiner released a statement Friday ruling his death a homicide, saying it was caused by the “physical restraint by police during excited delirium due to acute phencyclidine (PCP) intoxication,” according to CNN.

Singleton was taken into police custody after a yellow cab driver waved down a police officer near St. Patrick’s Cathedral in Manhattan, police said in a statement. The cab driver claimed the passenger was “acting overly irate and irrational, cursing and screaming and causing alarm,” according to the statement, the report says.

Singleton then exited the taxi and “became combative with the officer, trying to fight with him,” the report says. The officer radioed for assistance and other officers responded along with members of the NYPD Emergency Service Unit. He was placed in a “protective body wrap by the ESU officers,” the police statement said.

An ambulance was taking Singleton to a hospital when he went into cardiac arrest, the statement said. Singleton was dead on arrival at Roosevelt Hospital, the report says.

The NYPD said it was cooperating with the Manhattan district attorney’s office investigation of the death.

The death of a 45-year-old man who struggled with police while being taken into custody in July in New York City has been ruled a homicide by the medical examiner’s office, according to CNN.

The man, Ronald Singleton, died in police custody on July 13, just four days before Eric Garner died after an officer put him in a choke hold, the report says. Garner’s death, also ruled a homicide by the New York City Medical Examiner, ignited protests across the nation about the use of excessive force by police in the black community.

In Singleton’s case, the medical examiner released a statement Friday ruling his death a homicide, saying it was caused by the “physical restraint by police during excited delirium due to acute phencyclidine (PCP) intoxication,” according to CNN.

Singleton was taken into police custody after a yellow cab driver waved down a police officer near St. Patrick’s Cathedral in Manhattan, police said in a statement. The cab driver claimed the passenger was “acting overly irate and irrational, cursing and screaming and causing alarm,” according to the statement, the report says.

Singleton then exited the taxi and “became combative with the officer, trying to fight with him,” the report says. The officer radioed for assistance and other officers responded along with members of the NYPD Emergency Service Unit. He was placed in a “protective body wrap by the ESU officers,” the police statement said.

An ambulance was taking Singleton to a hospital when he went into cardiac arrest, the statement said. Singleton was dead on arrival at Roosevelt Hospital, the report says.

The NYPD said it was cooperating with the Manhattan district attorney’s office investigation of the death.

Supporters of an Oklahoma City police officer who was charged with raping or sexually abusing eight black women have raised more than $7,000 for the 27-year-old cop.

Daniel Holtzclaw was arrested in August on charges of rape, forcible oral sodomy, sexual battery, and indecent exposure for allegedly sexually assaulting women while on patrol. He is being held on $5 million bond.

Friends and family of the three-year veteran of the Oklahoma City Police Department have created a Facebook page called “Justice for Daniel Holtzclaw.” They insist the criminal allegations against him are false, and have been using the page to try to sell shirts that read, “Free the Claw” and “#JusticeForDanielHoltzclaw.”

More than 500 people have “liked” the Facebook page.

Supporters of Holtzclaw have also launched a crowdfunding campaign on the website GoFundMe. The page was created by Holtzclaw’s sister, who hopes to raise $100,000 for her brother, according to MLive.com. The crowdfunding campaign has raised $7,390 so far.

“The pursuit of Justice will be lengthy, but with the support of Family, Friends, and the Community, Daniel Holtzclaw will be vindicated and justice will prevail,” the page states. “All funds raised will assist Daniel and his Family as they seek the JUSTICE Daniel Holtzclaw so rightly deserves.”

Prosecutors claim that Holtzclaw stopped women, who were all black and between the ages of 34 and 58, while on patrol and threatened to arrest them or physically harm them unless they exposed themselves, allowed him to fondle them, or had sex with him.

Supporters of an Oklahoma City police officer who was charged with raping or sexually abusing eight black women have raised more than $7,000 for the 27-year-old cop.

Daniel Holtzclaw was arrested in August on charges of rape, forcible oral sodomy, sexual battery, and indecent exposure for allegedly sexually assaulting women while on patrol. He is being held on $5 million bond.

Friends and family of the three-year veteran of the Oklahoma City Police Department have created a Facebook page called “Justice for Daniel Holtzclaw.” They insist the criminal allegations against him are false, and have been using the page to try to sell shirts that read, “Free the Claw” and “#JusticeForDanielHoltzclaw.”

More than 500 people have “liked” the Facebook page.

Supporters of Holtzclaw have also launched a crowdfunding campaign on the website GoFundMe. The page was created by Holtzclaw’s sister, who hopes to raise $100,000 for her brother, according to MLive.com. The crowdfunding campaign has raised $7,390 so far.

“The pursuit of Justice will be lengthy, but with the support of Family, Friends, and the Community, Daniel Holtzclaw will be vindicated and justice will prevail,” the page states. “All funds raised will assist Daniel and his Family as they seek the JUSTICE Daniel Holtzclaw so rightly deserves.”

Prosecutors claim that Holtzclaw stopped women, who were all black and between the ages of 34 and 58, while on patrol and threatened to arrest them or physically harm them unless they exposed themselves, allowed him to fondle them, or had sex with him.

psych-facts:

psych2go:

Read our article about why Red triggers appetite! The psychology behind it will be helpful in your studies. 

One of my current favs about the psychology behind color. Give it a read! 

bigblack0one:

questionall:

* Panel issues recommendations after review of U.S. record

* Says killing of Michael Brown “not an isolated event”

* Decries racial bias of police, pervasive discrimination

* ACLU calls for addressing racial inequality in America

GENEVA, Aug 29 (Reuters) - The U.N. racism watchdog urged the United States on Friday to halt the excessive use of force by police after the fatal shooting of an unarmed black teenager by a white policeman touched off riots in Ferguson, Missouri.

Minorities, particularly African Americans, are victims of disparities, the U.N. Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) said after examining the U.S. record.

"Racial and ethnic discrimination remains a serious and persistent problem in all areas of life from de facto school segregation, access to health care and housing," Noureddine Amir, CERD committee vice chairman, told a news briefing.

Teenager Michael Brown was shot dead by a white police officer on Aug. 9, triggering violent protests that rocked Ferguson - a St. Louis suburb - and shone a global spotlight on the state of race relations in America.

"The excessive use of force by law enforcement officials against racial and ethnic minorities is an ongoing issue of concern and particularly in light of the shooting of Michael Brown," said Amir, an expert from Algeria.

"This is not an isolated event and illustrates a bigger problem in the United States, such as racial bias among law enforcement officials, the lack of proper implementation of rules and regulations governing the use of force, and the inadequacy of training of law enforcement officials."

The panel of 18 independent experts grilled a senior U.S. delegation on Aug. 13 about what they said was persistent racial discrimination against African-Americans and other minorities, including within the criminal justice system.

U.S. Ambassador Keith Harper told the panel that his nation had made “great strides toward eliminating racial discrimination” but conceded that “we have much left to do”.

Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson, who shot Brown, has been put on paid leave and is in hiding. A St. Louis County grand jury has begun hearing evidence and the U.S. Justice Department has opened its own investigation.

Police have said Brown struggled with Wilson when shot. But some witnesses say Brown held up his hands and was surrendering when he was shot multiple times in the head and chest.

"STAND YOUR GROUND" LAWS

In its conclusions issued on Friday, the U.N. panel said “Stand Your Ground” Laws, a controversial self-defense statute in 22 U.S. states, should be reviewed to “remove far-reaching immunity and ensure strict adherence to principles of necessity and proportionality when deadly force is used for self-defense”.

Ron Davis, father of Jordan Davis, a 17-year-old shot dead in a car in Jacksonville, Florida during an argument over loud rap music in November 2012, attended the Geneva session. Sybrina Fulton, mother of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black teen killed in Miami, Florida by a neighborhood watch volunteer, testified.

The U.N. panel monitors compliance with a treaty ratified by 177 countries including the United States.

"The Committee remains concerned at the practice of racial profiling of racial or ethnic minorities by law enforcement officials, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Transportation Security Administration, border enforcement officials and local police," it said, urging investigations.

The experts called for addressing obstacles faced by minorities and indigenous peoples to exercise their right to vote effectively. This was due to restrictive voter identification laws, district gerrymandering and state-level laws that disenfranchise people convicted of felonies, it said.

Jamil Dakwar of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) said the U.N. recommendations highlighted “shortcomings on racial equality that we are seeing play out today on our streets, at our borders and in the voting booth.

"When it comes to human rights, the United States must practice at home what it preaches abroad," he said.

Fantastic

yinx1:

l20music:

adonisbishop:

judah25:

Jill Scott

Jill Scott is sexy as FUCK!!!

CLAWWWWWD i love me some Jill Scott!!

hourglass say DAMN

A sharp class distinction has arisen, producing a mini-class of Blacks who benefited most by the civil rights and Black Liberation movements, thinking and acting as if our historic struggle has been won so that they can become as arrogant and ignorant as the worst examples of white America.

Amiri Barak from “A Post-Racial Anthology?” in Poetry Magazine, May 2013 (via superoeuvre)

#Obama

(via wocinsolidarity)

#BlackTumblr

(via revenge-of-socrates)
takeprideinyourheritage:

EXCLUSIVE: St. Louis Police Officer Blows the Whistle on Rampant Corruption Within the Department
“I wouldn’t have came down here (to Ferguson) and stood on those front lines, I would have taken my uniform off and have resigned. I didn’t have to come down here, but I would not have come down here and oppressed these people.”
http://thefreethoughtproject.com/suspended-st-louis-officer-speaks-darren-wilson-department/

takeprideinyourheritage:

EXCLUSIVE: St. Louis Police Officer Blows the Whistle on Rampant Corruption Within the Department

“I wouldn’t have came down here (to Ferguson) and stood on those front lines, I would have taken my uniform off and have resigned. I didn’t have to come down here, but I would not have come down here and oppressed these people.”

http://thefreethoughtproject.com/suspended-st-louis-officer-speaks-darren-wilson-department/