Revolutionary Mindset
“It is impossible to create a formula for the future which does
not take into account that our society has been doing something special against the Negro for hundreds of years. How then can he be absorbed into the mainstream of American life if we do not do something special for him now, in order to balance the equation and equip him to compete on a just and equal basis? What will it profit him to be able to send his children to an integrated school if the family income is insufficient to buy them school clothes? What will he gain by being permitted to move into an integrated neighborhood if he cannot afford to do so because he is unemployed or has a low-paying job with no future?

In asking for something special, the Negro is not seeking charity.
He does not want to languish on welfare rolls any more than the next
man. He does not want to be given a job he cannot handle. Neither,
however, does he want to be told that there is no place where he can be
trained to handle it. Few people consider the fact that, in addition to
being enslaved for two centuries, the Negro was, during all those years, robbed of the wages of his toil. No amount of gold could provide an adequate compensation for the exploitation and humiliation of the Negro in America down through the centuries. Not all the wealth of this affluent society could meet the bill. Yet a price can be placed on unpaid wages.”

“It is impossible to create a formula for the future which does
not take into account that our society has been doing something special against the Negro for hundreds of years. How then can he be absorbed into the mainstream of American life if we do not do something special for him now, in order to balance the equation and equip him to compete on a just and equal basis? What will it profit him to be able to send his children to an integrated school if the family income is insufficient to buy them school clothes? What will he gain by being permitted to move into an integrated neighborhood if he cannot afford to do so because he is unemployed or has a low-paying job with no future?

In asking for something special, the Negro is not seeking charity.
He does not want to languish on welfare rolls any more than the next
man. He does not want to be given a job he cannot handle. Neither,
however, does he want to be told that there is no place where he can be
trained to handle it. Few people consider the fact that, in addition to
being enslaved for two centuries, the Negro was, during all those years, robbed of the wages of his toil. No amount of gold could provide an adequate compensation for the exploitation and humiliation of the Negro in America down through the centuries. Not all the wealth of this affluent society could meet the bill. Yet a price can be placed on unpaid wages.”

Ruth Hunter was stunned one morning earlier in April when her front door abruptly flew open and she heard shouts of “Police!” WTVR reports.

"I thought someone was breaking in to rob or kill me," the 75-year-old Virginia grandmother, who likes to keep to herself, told the news station.

But it was state law enforcement conducting a raid for a drug investigation, and they tied up the elderly lady’s hands before peppering her with questions.

"They asked me if I ever stored drugs for anybody. I said, ‘How dare you insult my integrity?’ " Hunter told WTVR. "Took my hand and handcuffed me with the ties, and then, after they did that—because they told me I was under arrest … that’s when they proceeded to ask questions.

"He asked if maybe my granddaughter was involved. I sat up in my bed, like, ‘How dare you try and bring my granddaughter into this stuff?’ She’s a law-abiding citizen, works for a living; she don’t even like coming here," Hunter added.

The officers eventually stopped questioning her but left her tied up to investigate another apartment two doors down. The man at that apartment was eventually arrested in what appears to have been a mix-up. According to WTVR, the search warrant does have Hunter’s address and apartment number, but authorities found nothing incriminating in her apartment.

Hunter has lived in the Henrico County apartment for six years and has never interacted much with others … but she’s disturbed by her ordeal and now plans to leave. She says that what upsets her even more, though, is the fact that the officer never apologized for the confusion.

"I’m angry. I’m very angry. I’m very irritated because he never came back … and said, ‘Ma’am, I apologize, I’m sorry.’ [Instead] he said, ‘Oh, you can get somebody to fix your door,’ " Hunter said. 

😡😡😡😡

Ruth Hunter was stunned one morning earlier in April when her front door abruptly flew open and she heard shouts of “Police!” WTVR reports.

"I thought someone was breaking in to rob or kill me," the 75-year-old Virginia grandmother, who likes to keep to herself, told the news station.

But it was state law enforcement conducting a raid for a drug investigation, and they tied up the elderly lady’s hands before peppering her with questions.

"They asked me if I ever stored drugs for anybody. I said, ‘How dare you insult my integrity?’ " Hunter told WTVR. "Took my hand and handcuffed me with the ties, and then, after they did that—because they told me I was under arrest … that’s when they proceeded to ask questions.

"He asked if maybe my granddaughter was involved. I sat up in my bed, like, ‘How dare you try and bring my granddaughter into this stuff?’ She’s a law-abiding citizen, works for a living; she don’t even like coming here," Hunter added.

The officers eventually stopped questioning her but left her tied up to investigate another apartment two doors down. The man at that apartment was eventually arrested in what appears to have been a mix-up. According to WTVR, the search warrant does have Hunter’s address and apartment number, but authorities found nothing incriminating in her apartment.

Hunter has lived in the Henrico County apartment for six years and has never interacted much with others … but she’s disturbed by her ordeal and now plans to leave. She says that what upsets her even more, though, is the fact that the officer never apologized for the confusion.

"I’m angry. I’m very angry. I’m very irritated because he never came back … and said, ‘Ma’am, I apologize, I’m sorry.’ [Instead] he said, ‘Oh, you can get somebody to fix your door,’ " Hunter said.

😡😡😡😡

dynastylnoire:

hallease:

dynastylnoire:

horcha-ta:

malebetulia:

composmentisfuck:

katara:


Ugandan baby being weighed at clinic.

 

my heart doe

cutest baby EVER

😍

O.O the overwhelming joy and cute of this child

Sound Mind Hallease: 0__o NO BABIES! 
Hormonal Hallease: But they’re so cute I want one to hold forever! …or 10..yeah I want 10! 

^that

dynastylnoire:

hallease:

dynastylnoire:

horcha-ta:

malebetulia:

composmentisfuck:

katara:

Ugandan baby being weighed at clinic.


 

my heart doe

cutest baby EVER

😍

O.O the overwhelming joy and cute of this child

Sound Mind Hallease: 0__o NO BABIES! 

Hormonal Hallease: But they’re so cute I want one to hold forever! …or 10..yeah I want 10! 

^that

bookpatrol:

Painting by Max Ginsburg. Used as cover illustration for  ”THE FRIENDS” by Rosa Guy.

bookpatrol:

Painting by Max Ginsburg. Used as cover illustration for  ”THE FRIENDS” by Rosa Guy.

"No parent should ever have to bury and survive their child, particularly before their 19th birthday. It is particularly difficult when that life is taken by a grave injustice.

My son Ramarley was unjustifiably shot and killed in front of his grandmother and 6-year-old brother in our home by a NYPD officer.

Ramarley had no weapon, posed no threat, and should have been safe.

But NYPD officer Richard Haste unlawfully entered our home and recklessly drew and fired his weapon on my unarmed son, changing the dynamic of our family forever.

It is critical that Ramarley’s murder not be in vain and without justice.

We expect our police department to serve and protect us, but that didn’t happen on that February day two years ago.

Worse is that after two grand juries convened by the Bronx District Attorney’s office and two years later, we have still not received justice and there has been no accountability.

Now, it is up to the U.S. Justice Department to live up to its mission and provide some measure of justice for Ramarley, our family and our city.

Sadly, what our family has been going through is not unique.

Dozens of families in New York City over the past two decades have unjustly lost loved ones to police shootings and violence. Most have not received justice.

The lives of Amadou Diallo, Sean Bell, and so many other New Yorkers like Ramarley — primarily Black and Latino — have not been honored by our justice system.

When defenders of abusive stop-and-frisk police practices claimed the NYPD already had sufficient oversight and mechanisms of accountability by citing district attorneys and other entities, it always struck me as disingenuous given the consistent failures to hold officers accountable for recklessly taking the lives of so many unarmed New Yorkers.

While I hope the federal court’s stop-and-frisk reform process will begin soon now that the de Blasio administration has agreed to drop the Bloomberg-era appeal, this new administration should also take serious steps to ensure there is accountability and zero tolerance for unjust police violence against New Yorkers. That would provide some amount of justice to the many families that have experienced similar tragedies and help prevent any more from suffering in the future.

For our family, justice must be served by the U.S. Department of Justice because of the failures of our local system.

And while no federal charges or court ruling will ever bring Ramarley back, justice can help provide some level of confidence in our system and the concept of right and wrong.

I was unable to celebrate my son’s last three birthdays with him, but I need to know that our government and legal system serves justice and cares equally about the lives of all people.

That is not clear so far.

As a mother, I maintain optimism that we will see justice for Ramarley.

I will continue to fight for it and remind those in decision-making positions and the larger public: What if it were your child, or sibling?

No mother, parent or family should ever have to go through this.”

Constance Malcolm is the mother of Ramarley Graham, who was shot and killed by a NYPD officer in the family’s Bronx home in February 2012 despite being unarmed.

#JusticeForRamarleyGraham

"No parent should ever have to bury and survive their child, particularly before their 19th birthday. It is particularly difficult when that life is taken by a grave injustice.

My son Ramarley was unjustifiably shot and killed in front of his grandmother and 6-year-old brother in our home by a NYPD officer.

Ramarley had no weapon, posed no threat, and should have been safe.

But NYPD officer Richard Haste unlawfully entered our home and recklessly drew and fired his weapon on my unarmed son, changing the dynamic of our family forever.

It is critical that Ramarley’s murder not be in vain and without justice.

We expect our police department to serve and protect us, but that didn’t happen on that February day two years ago.

Worse is that after two grand juries convened by the Bronx District Attorney’s office and two years later, we have still not received justice and there has been no accountability.

Now, it is up to the U.S. Justice Department to live up to its mission and provide some measure of justice for Ramarley, our family and our city.

Sadly, what our family has been going through is not unique.

Dozens of families in New York City over the past two decades have unjustly lost loved ones to police shootings and violence. Most have not received justice.

The lives of Amadou Diallo, Sean Bell, and so many other New Yorkers like Ramarley — primarily Black and Latino — have not been honored by our justice system.

When defenders of abusive stop-and-frisk police practices claimed the NYPD already had sufficient oversight and mechanisms of accountability by citing district attorneys and other entities, it always struck me as disingenuous given the consistent failures to hold officers accountable for recklessly taking the lives of so many unarmed New Yorkers.

While I hope the federal court’s stop-and-frisk reform process will begin soon now that the de Blasio administration has agreed to drop the Bloomberg-era appeal, this new administration should also take serious steps to ensure there is accountability and zero tolerance for unjust police violence against New Yorkers. That would provide some amount of justice to the many families that have experienced similar tragedies and help prevent any more from suffering in the future.

For our family, justice must be served by the U.S. Department of Justice because of the failures of our local system.

And while no federal charges or court ruling will ever bring Ramarley back, justice can help provide some level of confidence in our system and the concept of right and wrong.

I was unable to celebrate my son’s last three birthdays with him, but I need to know that our government and legal system serves justice and cares equally about the lives of all people.

That is not clear so far.

As a mother, I maintain optimism that we will see justice for Ramarley.

I will continue to fight for it and remind those in decision-making positions and the larger public: What if it were your child, or sibling?

No mother, parent or family should ever have to go through this.”

Constance Malcolm is the mother of Ramarley Graham, who was shot and killed by a NYPD officer in the family’s Bronx home in February 2012 despite being unarmed.

#JusticeForRamarleyGraham

aliyayisrael:

anukkinearthwalker:

  1. Project Moonstruck, 1952, CIA:

    • Electronic implants in brain and teeth

    • Targeting: Long range

    • Implanted during surgery or surreptitiously during abduction

    • Frequency range: HF - ELF transceiver implants

    • Purpose: Tracking, mind and…

descentintotyranny:

U.S. Apartheid Abuse Cases Against Ford, IBM Go Ahead
Apr. 18 2014
A federal judge on Thursday declined to toss out decade-old lawsuits that accuse IBM Corp. and Ford Motor Co. of supporting apartheid by letting their subsidiaries sell computers and cars to the South African government.
The three lawsuits seek to hold IBM and Ford responsible for race-based injustices including rape, torture and murder under apartheid, a system of race-based segregation and discrimination against nonwhites that ended 20 years ago.
The U.S. Supreme Court recently ruled on the legal reach of the statute under which the plaintiffs are suing, the Alien Tort Statute. The 1789 statute originally was enacted to prosecute pirates and was revived in recent decades to permit lawsuits in the United States against those who violate human rights abroad.
Thursday’s ruling from Judge Shira Scheindlin in Manhattan allows plaintiffs to file amended complaints that fit within the reach ruled upon by the Supreme Court.
Emails seeking comment from Armonk-based IBM and Dearborn, Michigan-based Ford weren’t immediately answered.
Close to 80 companies initially were named in the lawsuits, filed about 12 years ago, and the vast majority of those claims were rejected.
A district judge threw out the lawsuits in 2004, saying he did not have jurisdiction. He noted that Congress had supported and encouraged business investment in South Africa as a way to achieve greater respect for human rights and a reduction in poverty. And he cited vigorous objections to the lawsuits by the U.S. and its allies.
The U.S. had said the lawsuits posed a foreign policy problem, threatening to inflame U.S. relations with South Africa. The South African government had said the cases interfered with its rights to litigate such claims itself, though it later reversed its position.

descentintotyranny:

U.S. Apartheid Abuse Cases Against Ford, IBM Go Ahead

Apr. 18 2014

A federal judge on Thursday declined to toss out decade-old lawsuits that accuse IBM Corp. and Ford Motor Co. of supporting apartheid by letting their subsidiaries sell computers and cars to the South African government.

The three lawsuits seek to hold IBM and Ford responsible for race-based injustices including rape, torture and murder under apartheid, a system of race-based segregation and discrimination against nonwhites that ended 20 years ago.

The U.S. Supreme Court recently ruled on the legal reach of the statute under which the plaintiffs are suing, the Alien Tort Statute. The 1789 statute originally was enacted to prosecute pirates and was revived in recent decades to permit lawsuits in the United States against those who violate human rights abroad.

Thursday’s ruling from Judge Shira Scheindlin in Manhattan allows plaintiffs to file amended complaints that fit within the reach ruled upon by the Supreme Court.

Emails seeking comment from Armonk-based IBM and Dearborn, Michigan-based Ford weren’t immediately answered.

Close to 80 companies initially were named in the lawsuits, filed about 12 years ago, and the vast majority of those claims were rejected.

A district judge threw out the lawsuits in 2004, saying he did not have jurisdiction. He noted that Congress had supported and encouraged business investment in South Africa as a way to achieve greater respect for human rights and a reduction in poverty. And he cited vigorous objections to the lawsuits by the U.S. and its allies.

The U.S. had said the lawsuits posed a foreign policy problem, threatening to inflame U.S. relations with South Africa. The South African government had said the cases interfered with its rights to litigate such claims itself, though it later reversed its position.

mama-panther:

historicporn:

Man uses American flag to assault civil rights activist.1976.

American politics in one image.

mama-panther:

historicporn:

Man uses American flag to assault civil rights activist.

1976.

American politics in one image.